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Jeep 4.6L Stroker Motor Pistons, Rods and Crankshaft Bearings!

This series includes six HD video interviews with Tony Hewes...In addition to the video on this page, you will find the other five HD videos at the '4WD Tech How-to Channel' playlist!

 
HD Video Interview: Tony Hewes discusses the 4.6L stroker pistons, connecting rods and bearings.

Cast pistons with coating are a high-tech choice for durability in a street/rugged trail engine.

     For the 4.6L stroker motor with its 4.2L crankshaft, there are two connecting rod approaches: use of 258/4.2L connecting rods or staying with the 4.0L's original connecting rods. This choice will dictate the piston pin location as well.

Hone works on small and big end of rods or jobs as large as motorcycle cylinder honing.

     In this HD video interview at Hewes Performance Machine, Tony Hewes shares two 4.6L engine buildups. One engine has 4.2L connecting rods and performance cast (coated skirt) pistons. The other engine uses 4.0L rods with design-specific, high performance forged pistons. The high-tech cast pistons allow closer piston-to-wall clearances and are quieter for cold starting and during warm-up. 

     Forged pistons serve high performance demands like high-rpm use, turbocharging and high compression ratios. (They run with more wall clearance to allow for the expansion of the piston alloy.) Trail-and-street 4.6L engines run best around 8.7:1 compression. Cast, coated pistons work well at this level, and lower octane pump gas should work with the rebuilt 4.0L cylinder head. 

Lower end of 4.6L stroker reveals the 4.2L crankshaft and choice of 4.2L or 4.0L connecting rods.

     Get insight directly from Tony Hewes and Moses Ludel...Save time, money and headaches by building your 4.6L stroker motor the right way—the first time!

Want quality automotive machine work or a precision engine build-up? See the Hewes Performance Machine website at: